Health & Safe Travel

Cape Town is generally a safe place, but take note of the advice and emergency numbers below to make sure your trip is as safe and enjoyable as possible.  …

Cape Town is generally a safe place, but take note of the advice and emergency numbers below to make sure your trip is as safe and enjoyable as possible.

 

Emergency Numbers

Emergencies from a mobile: 112

Emergencies from a landline: 107

South African Police Service: 10111

Medical & Fire Emergencies: 021 535 1100

Table Mountain NP Emergencies: 021 480 7700

Sea & Mountain Rescue: 021 948 9900

National Sea Rescue Institute: 082 911

Baboon Monitors: 071 588 6540

Shark Spotters: 078 174 4244

Ambulance: 10177

 

General Advice

High-quality tap (faucet) water is available across the city and it is both palatable and safe to drink straight from the tap.

The quality of the food is excellent, and Cape Town has some of the top restaurants in the world.

We have a warm sunny climate and you should wear sunscreen and a hat whenever you are out of doors during the day, particularly between 10am and 4pm.

Always keep a copy of your identity document or passport on your person and keep travel documents and certified photocopies of all valuable and travel documents in a safe place.

Use accredited booking agents and choose accommodation that has been graded or endorsed by a local tourism authority. When in doubt check with Cape Town Tourism.

Street children and beggars may approach you for a hand out. If you wish to do good, please give food instead of money or donate to a local organisation that assists people in need.

Medical

Medical facilities in Cape Town are world-class. There is an excellent network of both state and private hospitals.

If you’re an adult, you won’t need any inoculations unless you’re travelling from a yellow-fever endemic area (the yellow fever belt of Africa or South America), in which case you will need certification to prove your inoculation status when you arrive in the country.

Hepatitis B inoculations are recommended for children up to the age of 12 who have not completed the series of injections as infants. Cape Town is a malaria-free area.

Safety In Table Mountain National Park

If you are going hiking in Cape Town, please read our Hiking safety tips.

Cape Town Tourism recommends the use of a qualified mountain guide should you wish to explore Table Mountain National Park on foot. To book a guide, phone the Contact Centre on 0861 322 223.

If you are going without a guide, make sure you take a map, keep to  demarcated paths and do not go alone. Wear comfortable walking shoes and take along  a hat and something warm as the weather can change suddenly on the mountain. Also take enough water, sunblock and a charged mobile phone with emergency numbers saved.  Tell someone where you are going and when you should be expected back, and start heading back well before dark.

 

Avoiding crime

Avoid carrying large sums of cash, and try not to have expensive electronic devices and jewelry in plain sight.

Do not leave belongings unattended.

Do not venture into unknown areas alone and heed the advice of your hosts, Cape Town Tourism visitor centre staff and locals on places to avoid after dark.

Do not walk alone and take care in isolated areas.

Lock your doors when driving and do not pick up strangers.

When parking, lock valuables in the boot (trunk) of the car. After dark, try to park in a secure, well-lit area.

Do not allow strangers to assist you in any way at cash machines.

When reporting an incident, ask for identification from your safety officials – all City of Cape Town police and law enforcement officials, and South African Police Service (SAPS) officers, carry an identification card showing the officer’s name, rank, service or staff number and a photograph. If in uniform, officers wear service and rank insignia and a name badge. You have the right to ask officers, uniformed or not, to identify themselves with their cards.